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The Misadventures of Quinxy von Besiex truths, lies, and everything in between

20Dec/120

Hate Windows 8? No, you don’t! You just need Start8 from Stardock!

start8With a cost of only $15 to upgrade recent computers from Windows 7 to Windows 8, many have been and will be tempted to upgrade.  If you're like me you'll find Windows 8 more frustrating than sublime.  Cobbling together a touch friendly UI meant for tablets with a decades old UI meant for mousing was an ambitiously lousy idea.  That having been said, everything else about Windows 8 I like; it is built upon the internal and external improvements of Windows 7.  But how could I return my Windows 8 computer back to the sanity of my mouse-friendly Windows 7-ish UI?  After trying some alternatives (including a month spent with the disappointing  StartMenuX), I finally arrived at the solution that was right for me: Start8 from Stardock.  For a very reasonable $4.99 you can (optionally) bypass the new Windows 8 start screen and return to a desktop with a wonderfully close facsimile of the previous Windows  start menu.  I've been a user of various Stardock software for a while, and though I've had my frustrations with some buggy and over-reaching software, when they get it right they really get it right, and this is one fine example.

Since going back my productivity is back to where it was and I feel saner than ever.

^ Quinxy

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2Dec/122

How to Activate a Clean Install of Windows 8 with an Upgrade Key

If you used your Windows 8 Upgrade media to install a clean copy of Windows you've probably discovered by now that Windows 8 won't activate, telling you that your key is for upgrade and not clean install. Don't fret, there is a simple solution which does not require you pointlessly installing an old copy of XP, Vista, or Windows 7!

The easy three-step solution is:

  1. Modify the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\OOBE and set the MediaBootInstall value to 0 (zero).
  2. Open an elevated command-prompt (run command as admin) and execute this command: "slmgr -rearm"
  3. Reboot!

Enjoy!

I'm not sharing this tip as a way to cheat Microsoft out of a dollar, I'm sharing it because anyone experienced enough to be installing a copy of Windows 8 on a clean hard drive has surely owned enough Microsoft computers over the years to legitimately qualify for the upgrade.  With Windows XP through Windows 7 qualifying I know in the last 12 years I've owned and still have legal rights to at least 10 - 15 installations (mostly from retired computers).

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5Jun/121

Microsoft Leaves .Net 3.5 (and earlier) support out of Windows 8?!?!

In a moment of anything but wisdom Microsoft has decided to leave earlier versions of the .Net (dotnet) Framework out of the Windows 8 install, including only 4 and 4.5. The reason they give for this peculiar decision is their desire to have a smaller OS install footprint. While less disk space lost to an OS install is a very noble goal, I can think of few things worse to leave out. Any user with Windows 8 who subsequently downloads and wants to use an application written against the 3.5 or earlier .Net runtimes will be forced to install (over the 'net) a reboot-required multi-hundred megabyte installer (supporting .Net 3.5, 3.0, and 2.0). Few things deter a potential user of your software more than a lengthy download and a forced reboot.

Adding insult to injury is that I am quite sure their smaller OS footprint goal is little more than an attempt to defend against one of Apple's (and others) easy anti-Windows attacks. Unless Microsoft has radically altered the way they handle Windows Updates, their Driver Store, WinSXS, temporary files, etc. then whatever savings they claim at initial install will be gone in a few months; the Windows directory of my 1.5 year old computer is a whopping 37 GB.

Why couldn't Microsoft leave out MS Paint, MS Write, Solitaire, audio recorder, Pinball, or hell, even Internet Explorer, and include the full range of .Net support? Now us poor developers are going to need to once again need to distribute versions of our software targeting multiple runtimes just to ensure most users don't have to do the absurd .Net installs.

^ Quinxy

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